A National Symbol

 

The Pledge of Allegiance of 1892:

"I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands- one nation indivisible- with liberty and justice for all."

On September 8, 1892, the Boston based "The Youth's Companion" magazine published a few words for students to repeat on Columbus Day that year. These words were written by Francis Bellamy, of Rome, New York. Leaflets were sent to public schools across the country. On October 12, 1892, the quadricentennial (400 years) of Columbus' arrival, more than 12 million children recited the Pledge of Allegiance, thus beginning a required school-day ritual.

 

At the first National Flag Conference in Washington, D.C., on June 14, 1923, a change was made. To make it more clear, the words" the Flag of the United States" replaced "my flag".

 

It was not until 1942, that Congress officially recognized the Pledge of Allegiance. One year later, in June, 1943, the Supreme Court ruled that school children could not be forced to recite it. In fact, today only half of our fifty states have laws that encourage the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in the classroom.

In June of 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, suggested that an amendment was made to add the words "under God".

 

The original Pledge of Allegiance:

"I pledge allegiance to my Flag, and the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all."

 

Today's Pledge of Allegiance:

"I pledge allegiance to the Flag, of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

How many changes have been made to the Pledge?

In what year was the Pledge recited?

 

I hope that you learned something about the Pledge.

 

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